Tracker 3.0: It’s Here!

This is part 1 of a series. Come back next week to find out more about the changes in Tracker 3.0.

It’s too early to say “Job done”. But we’ve passed the biggest milestone on the project we announced last year: version 3.0 of Tracker is released and the rollout has begun!

We wanted to port all the core GNOME apps in a single release, and we almost achieved this ambitious goal. Nautilus, Boxes, Music, Rygel and Totem all now use Tracker 3. Photos will require 2.x until the next release. Outside of GNOME core, some apps are ported and some are not, so we are currently in a transitional period.

The important thing is only Tracker Miner FS 3 needs to run by default. Tracker Miner FS is the filesystem indexer which allows apps to do instant search and content discovery.

Since Photos 3.38 still uses Tracker 2.x we have modified it to start Tracker Miner FS 2 along with the app. This means the filesystem index in the central Tracker 2 database is kept up-to-date while Photos is running. This will increase resource usage, but only while you are using Photos. Other apps which are not yet ported may want to use the same method while they finish porting to Tracker 3 — see Photos merge request 142 to see how it’s done.

Flatpak apps can safely use Tracker Miner FS 3 on the host, via Tracker’s new portal which guards access to your data based on the type of content. It’s up to the app developer whether they use the system Tracker Miner service, or whether they run another instance inside the sandbox. There are upsides and downsides to both approaches.

We published some guidance for distributors in this thread on discourse.gnome.org.

Gratitude

We all owe thanks to Carlos for his huge effort re-thinking and re-implementing the core of Tracker. We should also thank Red Hat for sponsoring some of this work.

I also want to thank all the maintainers who collaborated with us. Marinus and Jean were early adopters in GNOME Music and gave valuable feedback including coming to the regular meetings, along with Jens who also ported Rygel early in the cycle. Bastien dug into reviewing the tracker3 grilo plugin, and made some big improvements for building Tracker Miners inside a Flatpak. In Nautilus, Ondrej and Antonio did some heroic last minute review of my branch and together we reworked the Starred Files feature to fix some long standing issues.

The new GNOME VM images were really useful for testing and catching issues early. The chat room is very responsive and friendly, Abderrahim, Jordan and Valentin all helped me a lot to get a working VM with Tracker 3.

GNOME’s release team were also responsive and helpful, right up to the last minute freeze break request which was crucial to avoiding a “Tracker Miner FS 2 and 3 running in parallel” scenario.

Thanks also to GNOME’s translation teams for keeping up with all the string changes in the CLI tool, and to distro packagers who are now working to make Tracker 3 available
to you.

Coming soon to your distro.

It takes time for a new GNOME release to reach users, because most distros have their own testing phase.

We can use Repology to see where Tracker 3 is available. Note that some distros package it in a new tracker3 package while others update the existing tracker package.

Let’s see both:

Packaging status Packaging status

Coming up…

I have a lot more to write about following the Tracker 3.0 release. I’ll be publishing a series of blog posts over the next month. Make sure you subscribe to my blog or to Planet GNOME to see them all!

Twitter without Infinite Scroll

I like reading stuff on twitter.com because a lot of interesting people write things there which they don’t write anywhere else.

But Twitter is designed to be addictive, and a key mechanism they use is the “infinite scroll” design. Infinite scroll has been called the Web’s slot machine because of the way it exploits our minds to make us keep reading. It’s an unethical design.

In an essay entitled “If the internet is addictive, why don’t we regulate it?”, the writer Michael Schulson says:

… infinite scroll has no clear benefit for users. It exists almost entirely to circumvent self-control.

Hopefully Twitter will one day consider the ethics of their design. Until then, I made a Firefox extension to remove the infinite scroll feature and replace it with a ‘Load older tweets’ link at the bottom of the page, like this:

example

The Firefox extension is called Twitter Without Infinite Scroll. It works by injecting some JavaScript code into the Twitter website which disconnects the ‘uiNearTheBottom’ event that would otherwise automatically fetch new data.

Quoting Michael Shulson’s article again:

Giving users a chance to pause and make a choice at the end of each discrete page or session tips the balance of power back in the individual’s direction.

So, if you are a Twitter user, enjoy your new-found power!

GUADEC call for talks ends this Sunday, 23rd April

GUADEC 2017 is just over three months away, which is a very long time in the future and leaves lots of time to organise everything (at least that’s what I keep telling myself).

However, the call for papers is closing this Sunday so if you have something you want to talk about in front of the GNOME community and you haven’t already submitted a talk then please head to the registration site and do so!

Once the call for papers closes, the Papers Committee will fetch their ceremonial robes and make their way to a cave deep in the Peak District for two weeks. There they will drink fresh spring water, hunt grouse on the moors and study your talk submissions in great detail. When two weeks is up, their votes are communicated back to Manchester using smoke signals and by Sunday 7th May you’ll be notified by email if your talk was accepted. From there we can organise travel sponsorship and finalize the schedule of the first 3 days of the conference, which should be available late next month.

We’ll put a separate call out for BoF sessions, workshops, and tutorial sessions to take place during the second half of GUADEC — the 23rd April deadline only applies to talks.

GUADEC accommodation

At this year’s GUADEC in Manchester we have rooms available for you right at the venue in lovely modern student townhouses. As I write this there are still some available to book along with your registration. In a couple of days we have to give final numbers to the University for how many rooms we want, so it would help us out if all the folk who want a room there could register and book one now if you haven’t already done so! We’ll have some available for later booking but we have to pay up front for them now so we can’t reserve too many.

Rooms for sponsored attendees are reserved separately so you don’t need to book now if your attendance depends on travel sponsorship.

If you are looking for a hotel, we have a hotel booking service run by Visit Manchester where you can get the best rates from various hotels right up til June 2017. (If you need to arrive before Thursday 27th July then you can to contact Visit Manchester directly for your booking at abs@visitmanchester.com).

We have had some great talk submissions already but there is room for plenty more, so make sure you also submit your idea for a talk before 23rd April!

GUADEC 2017: Friday 28th July to Wednesday 2nd August in Manchester, UK

I'm going to GUADEC 2017

The GUADEC 2017 team is happy to officially announce the dates and location of this year’s conference.

GUADEC 2017 will run from Friday 28th July to Wednesday 2nd August. The first three days will include talks and social events, as well as the GNOME Foundation’s AGM. This part of the conference will also include a 20th anniversary celebration for the GNOME project.

The second 3 days (from Monday 31st July to Wednesday 2nd August) are unconference-style and will include space for hacking, project BoF sessions and possibly training workshops.

The conference days will be at Manchester Metropolitan University’s Brooks Building. The unconference days will be in a nearby University building named The Shed.

Registration and a call for papers will be open later this month. More details, including travel and accommodation tips, are available now at the conference website: https://2017.guadec.org/

We are interested in running training workshops on Monday 31st July but nothing is planned yet. We would like to hear from anyone who interested in helping to organise a training workshop.

Inside view of MMU Brooks Building
Inside view of MMU Brooks Building

 

Manchester GNOME 3.22 Release Party – Friday 23rd Sept. @ MADLab

We are hosting a party for the new GNOME release this Friday (23rd September).

The venue is MADLab in Manchester city centre (here’s a map). We will be there between 18:00 and 21:00. There will be some free refreshments, an overview of the new features in 3.22, advice on how install a free desktop OS on your computer and how contribute to GNOME or a related Free Software project.

Everyone is welcome, including users of rival desktop environments & operating systems 🙂

release-party-invite

Codethink is hiring!

We are looking for people who can write code, who match one of these job descriptions at least slightly, and who are willing to relocate to Manchester, UK (so you must either be an EU resident, or able to get a work permit for the UK.) Manchester is number 8 in Lonely Planet’s Best In Travel list for 2016, so really you’d be doing yourself a favour to move here. Remote working is possible if you have lots of contributions to public software projects that demonstrate your amazingness.

There is a nice symmetry to this blog post, I remember reading a similar one quite a few years ago, which led to me applying for a job at Codethink, and i’ve been here ever since, with various trips to exotic countries in between.

If you’re interested, send a CV & cover letter to jobs@codethink.co.uk.