Blog about what you do!

Am I the first to blog from GUADEC 2019? It has been a great conference: huge respect to the organization team for volunteering significant time and energy to make it all run smoothly.

The most interesting thing at GUADEC is talking to community members old and new. I discovered that I don’t know much about what people are doing in GNOME. I discovered Antonio is doing user support / bug triage and more in Nautilus. I discovered that Bastian is posting GNOME-related questions and answers on StackOverflow. I discovered Britt is promoting us on Twitter and moderating discussions on Reddit. I discovered Felipe is starting to do direct user support for Boxes. I wouldn’t know any of this if I hadn’t been to GUADEC.

So here’s my plea — if you contribute to GNOME, please blog about it! If everyone reading this wrote just one blog post a year… I’d have a much better idea of what you’re all doing!

Don’t forget: Planet GNOME is not only for announcing cool new projects and features – it’s “a window into the world, work and lives of GNOME hackers and contributors.” Blog about anything GNOME related, and be yourself — we’re not a corporation, we’re an underground network with a global, diverse, free thinking membership and that’s our strength.

Remember that there’s much more to GNOME than software development — read this long list of skillsets that you’re probably using. Write about translations, user support, testing, documentation, packaging, outreach, foundation work, event organization, bug triage, product management, release management, design, infrastructure operations. Write about why you enjoy contributing to GNOME, write about why it’s important to you. Write about what you did yesterday, or what you did last month. Write about your friends in GNOME. Make some graphs about your project to show how much work you do. Write short posts, write them quickly. Don’t worry about minor errors — it’s a blog, not a magazine article. Don’t be scared that readers won’t be interested — we are! We’re a distributed team and we need to keep each other posted about what we’re doing. Show links, screenshots, discussions, photos, graphs, anything. Don’t write reports, write stories.

If you contribute to GNOME but don’t have a blog… please start one! Write some nice posts about what you do. Become a Foundation member if you haven’t already*, and ask to join Planet GNOME.

And even if you forget all that, remember this: positive feedback for contributions encourages more contributions. Writing a blog post, like any other form of contribution, can sometimes feel shouting into an abyss. If you read an interesting post, leave a positive comment & thank the author for taking the time to write it.

* The people using and reviewing your contributions will be happy to vouch for you, don’t worry about that!

GUADEC 2018 Videos: All Done

All the editing & uploading for the GUADEC videos is now finished. The videos were all uploaded to YouTube some time ago, and they are all now available on http://videos.guadec.org/2018 as well.

Thanks to everyone who helped with the editing: Alexis Diavatis, Bin Li, Garrett LeSage, Alexandre Franke (who also did a lot of the work of uploading to YouTube), and Hubert Figuiere (who managed to edit so many that I’m suspicious he might be some kind of robot in disguise).

edit: If you are hungry for more videos to edit, some footage from GUADEC 2002 has been unearthed. It’d be great to have some of this history from fifteen years ago up on YouTube! If you’re interested, reply to the mail or speak up in #guadec on GIMPnet and we can coordinate efforts.

GUADEC 2018 Videos: Help Wanted

At this year’s GUADEC in Almería we had a team of volunteers recording the talks in the second room. This was organized very last minute as initially the University were going to do this, but thanks to various efforts (thanks in particular to Adrien Plazas and Bin Li) we managed to record nearly all the talks. There were some issues with sound on both the Friday and Saturday, which Britt Yazel has done his best to overcome using science, and we are now ready to edit and upload the 19 talks that took place in the 2nd room.

To bring you the videos from last year we had a team of 5 volunteers from the local team who spent our whole weekend in the Codethink offices. (Although none of us had much prior video editing experience so the morning of the first day was largely spent trying out different video editors to see which had the features we needed and could run without crashing too often… and the afternoon was mostly figuring out how transitions worked in Kdenlive).

This year, we don’t have such a resource and so we are looking to distribute the editing.  If you can, please get involved so we can share the videos as soon as possible!

The list of videos and a step-by-step guide on how to edit them is available at https://wiki.gnome.org/GUADEC/2018/Video. The guide is written for people who have never done video editing before and recommends that you use Kdenlive; if you’re already familiar with a different tool then of course feel free to use that instead and just use the process as a guideline. The first video is already up, so you can also use this as a guide to follow.

If you want to know more, get in touch on the GUADEC mailing list, or the #guadec IRC channel.

42412488965_64b9afc8eb_z

2017 in review

I began this year in a hedge in Mexico City and immediately had to set off on a 2 day aeroplane trek back to Manchester to make a very tired return to work on the 3rd January. From there things calmed down somewhat and I was geared up for a fairly mundane year but in fact there have been many highlights!

The single biggest event was certainly bringing GUADEC 2017 to Manchester. I had various goals for this such as ensuring we got a GUADEC 2017, showing my colleages at Codethink that GNOME is a great community, and being in the top 10 page authors on wiki.gnome.org for the year. The run up to the event from about January to July took up many evenings and it was sometimes hard to trade it off with my work at Codethink; it was great working with Allan, Alberto, Lene and Javier though and once the conference actually arrived there was a mass positive force from all involved that made sure it went well. The strangest moment was definitely walking into Kro Bar slightly before the preregistration event was due to start to find half the GNOME community already crammed into the tiny bar area waiting for something to happen. Obviously my experience of organizing music events (where you can expect people to arrive about 2 hours after you want them somewhere) didn’t help here.

Codethink provides engineers with a travel budget a little bit of extra leave for attending conferences; obviously what with GUADEC being in Manchester I didn’t make a huge use of that this year, but I did make it to FOSDEM and also to PyConES which took place in the beautiful city of Cácares. My friend Pedro was part of the organizing team and it was great to watch him running round fighting fires all day while I relaxed and watched the talks (which were mostly all trying to explain machine learning in 30 minutes with varying degrees of success).

Stream powered carriageWork wise I spent most of my year looking at compilers and build tools, perhaps not my dream job but it’s an enjoyable area to work in because (at least in terms of build tools) the state of the art is comically bad. In 10 years we will look back at GNU Autotools in the way we look at a car that needs to be started with a hand crank, and perhaps the next generation of distro packagers will think back in wonder at how their forebears had to individually maintain dependency and configuration info in their different incompatible formats.

BuildStream is in a good state and is about to hit 1.0; it’s beginning to get battle tested in a couple of places (one of these being GNOME) which is no doubt going to be a rough ride — I already have a wide selection of performance bottlenecks to be looking at in the new year. But it’s looking already like a healthy community and I want to thanks to everyone who has already got behind the project.

It also seems to have been a great year for Meson; something that has been a long time coming but seems to be finally bringing Free Software build systems into the 21st century. Last year I ported Tracker to build with Meson, and have been doing various ongoing fixes to the new build system — we’re not yet able to fully switch to Autotools primary because of issue #2166, and also because of some Tracker test suite failures that seem to only show up with Meson that we haven’t yet dug into fully.

With GUADEC out of the way I managed to spend some time prototyping something I named Tagcloud. This is the next iteration of a concept that I’ve wanted since more or less forever, that of being able to apply arbitrary tags to different local and online resources in a nice way. On the web this is a widespread concept but for some reason the desktop world doesn’t seem to buy into it. Tracker is a key part of this puzzle, as it can deal with many types of content and can actually already handle tags if you don’t mind using the commandline so part of my work on Tagcloud has been making Tracker easy to embed as a subproject. This means I can try new stuff without messing up any session-wide Tracker setup, and it builds builds on some great work Carlos has been doing to modernize Tracker as well. I’ve been developing the app in Python, which has required me to fix issues in Tracker’s introspection bindings (and GLib’s, and GTK+’s … on the whole I find the PyGObject experience pretty good and it’s obviously been a massive effort to get this far, but at the same time these teething issues are quite demotivating.) Anyway I will post more about Tagcloud in the new year once some of the ideas are a bit further worked out; and of course it may end up going nowhere at all but it’s been nice to actually write a GTK+ app for the first time in ages, and to make use of Flatpak for the first time.

It’s also been a great year for the Flatpak project; and to be honest if it wasn’t for Flatpak I would probably have talked myself out of writing a new app before I’d even started. Previously the story for getting a new app to end users was that you must either be involved or know someone involved in a distro or two so that you can have 2+ year old versions of your app installable through a package manager; or your users have to know how to drive Git and a buildsystem from the commandline. Now I can build a flatpak bundle every time I push to master and link people straight to that. What a world! And did I mention GitLab? I don’t know how I ever lived without GitLab CI and I think that GNOME’s migration to GitLab is going to be *hugely* beneficial for the project.

Looking back it seems I’ve done more programming stuff than I thought I had; perhaps a good sign that you can achieve stuff without sacrificing too much of your spare time.

It’s also been a good year music wise, Manchester continues to have a fantastic music scene which has only got better with the addition of the Old Abbey Taphouse where I in fact spent the last 4 Saturdays in a row. Last Saturday we put on Babar Luck, I saw a great gig of his 10 years ago and have managed to keep missing him ever since but things finally worked out this time. Other highlights have been Paddy Steer, Baghdaddies and a very cold gig we did with the Rubber Duck Orchestra on the outdoor stage on a snowy December evening.

I caught a few gigs by Henge who only get better with time and who will hopefully break way out of Manchester next year. And in September I had the privilege of watching Jeffrey Lewis supported by The Burning Hell in a little wooden hut outside Lochcarron in Scotland, that was certainly a highlight despite being ill and wearing cold shoes.

Lochcarron TreehouseI didn’t actually know much of Scotland until taking the van up there this year; I was amazed that such a beautiful place has been there the whole time just waiting there 400 miles north. This expedition was originally planned to be a bike trip but ended up being a road trip, and having now seen the roads that is probably for the best. However we did manage a great bike trip around the Netherlands and Belgium, the first time I’ve done a week long bike trip and hopefully the beginning of a new tradition ! Last year I did a lot of travel to crazily distant places, its a privilege to be able to do so but one that I prefer to use sparingly so it was nice to get around closer to home this year.

All in all a pretty successful year, not straightforward at times but one with several steps in the directions I wanted to head. Let’s see what next year holds 🙂

GUADEC 2017: timeline

After the statistics perhaps you are interested in reading a timeline of GUADEC 2017! In particular you can compare it to the burn down chart from the GUADEC HowTo and see how that interacts with reality.

Of course lots of details are excised from this overview but it gives a general sense of the timings. In some follow up posts I’ll go in more detail about what I think went well and what didn’t. We also welcome your feedback on the event (if you can still remember it 🙂

Summer 2014: At some point during GUADEC 2014 I start going on about doing a Manchester edition.

August 2015: Alberto and Allan both float the idea of doing a Manchester bid with me; it seems like there’s just about enough of a team to go for it. I was already planning to be away in summer 2016 at this point so we decided to target 2017.

Alberto has a friend working at MIDAS who gives us a good start and we end up meeting with the Marketing Manchester conference bureau, the University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University.

The meeting with University of Manchester was discouraging (to be honest, they seemed to be geared up only for corporate conferences rather than volunteer-driven events) but Manchester Metropolitan were much more promising.

Winter 2015: We lost touch with MMU for a few months (presumably as University started back up), but we eventually got a proper contact in the conferences department and started moving forwards with the bid.

Spring 2016: Our bid is produced, with Marketing Manchester doing most of the content and layout (as you might be able to tell). Normally I would worry to see only one GUADEEC bid on the table but, having been thinking about our bid for almost a year already I was also glad that it looked like we’d be the main option.

Summer 2016: GUADEC 2016 in Karlsruhe; Manchester is selected as the location for 2017. Much rejoicing (although I am on a 9000 mile road trip at the time).

August 2016: Talks begin with venue drawing up contracts for venue and accommodation. The venue was reasonably painless to sort out but we spent lots of time figuring out accommodation; the University townhouses required final numbers and payment 6 months in advance of the event, so we spent a lot of time looking into other options (but ended up deciding that the townhouses would be best even though we would inevitably lose a bit money on them).

September 2016: We begin holding monthly-ish meetings with myself, Alberto, Allan and Javier present. Work begins on sponsorship brochure (which complicated by needing to coordinate with GNOME.Asia and potentially LAS), talks continue with venue.

December 2016: Contracts finally signed for venue and accommodation (4 months later!), conference dates finalized. We apply for a UK bank account as an “unincorporated association”. Discussion begins about the website, we decide to hold off on announcing the dates until we have some kind of website in place.

January 2017: Basic website finished, dates announced. Lots of work on getting the registration system ready. We begin meeting each week on a Monday evening. Initial logo made by Jakub and Allan.

February 2017: Trip to FOSDEM, where we put up a few GUADEC posters. Summer still seems a long way off. Codethink sponsorship confirmed. We start thinking about keynote speakers. Javier and Lene look into social event venues, including somewhere for the 20th birthday party(with hearts already set on MOSI). The search for new Executive Director for GNOME finally comes to a close with Neil McGovern being hired, and he soon starts joining the GUADEC calls and helping out (in particular with the search for sponsors, which up til now has been nearly all Alberto’s work).

March 2017: After 4 months of bureaucracy, our bank account finally approved. After much hacking and design work, we can finally open registration and the call for papers. We have to finalize room numbers at the University already, although most rooms are still unbooked. Investigation into getting GNOME Beer brewed (which ended up going nowhere, sadly). Requests for visa invites begin to arrive.

April 2017: Lots of planning for social events, the talk days and the unconference days. PIA sponsorship confirmed. Posters being designed. Call for papers closes, voting begins and Kat starts putting together the talks schedule.

May 2017: Birthday planning with help from the engagement team (in particular Nuritzi). The University temporarily decide that we’ll have to pay staff costs of £500 per day to have the canteen open; we do a bunch of research into alternatives but then we go back to the previous agreement of having the canteen open with just a minimum spend. Planning of video recording and design. Schedule and social events planning.

June and July 2017: Continual planning and discussion of everything. More sponsors confirmed. Allan does prodigious amounts of graphic design and organizing printing. Travel sponsorship finally confirmed and lots of visa invitation requests start to arrive. Accommodation bookings continue to come in, along with an increasing amount of queries, changes and cancellations that become quite time-consuming to keep track of and respond to. Evening events being booked and finalized, including more planning of the birthday party with Nuritzi. Discussions of how to make sure the conference is inclusive to newcomers. Water bottles, cake and T-shirts ordered. Registrations keep coming in until we actually hit and go over 200 registrations. We contact volunteers and come up with a timetable.

Finally, the day before GUADEC we collect the last of the printing, bring everything to the venue and hole up in a room on the 2nd floor ready to pre-print names on badges and stuff the lanyard pouches with gift bags. We discover two major issues: firstly the ink on the badges gets completely smudged when we run it through the printer to print a name on it; and secondly the emergency telephone number that we’ve printed on the badges has actually been recycled as the SIM card was inactive for a while and now goes through to some poor unsuspecting 3rd party.

guadec-badges.jpgWe lay out all the badges to try and dry the ink out but 3 hours later the smudging is still happening. We realise that the names will just have to be drawn on with marker pens. As for the emergency telephone… if you look closely at a GUADEC 2017 badge you’ll notice that there’s a sticky label with the correct number covering up the old number on the badge. Each one of these was printed onto stickyback paper and lovingly chopped out and stuck on by hand. You’re welcome! (Nobody actually called the emergency phone during the event).

Javier pointed out that we should be at the registration event at least an hour early (it started at 18:00). I said this was nonsense because most people wouldn’t get there til later anyway. How wrong I was !!! I’m used to organizing music events where people arrive about an hour after you tell them to, but we got to Kro Bar about 17:45 and it was already full to bursting with eager GNOME contributors, many of whom of course hadn’t seen each other for months. This was not the ideal environment to try and set up a registration desk for the first time and I mostly just stood around looking at boxes feeling confused and occasionally moving things around. Thankfully Kat and Benjamin soon arrived and made registration a reality leaving me free to drink a beer and remain confused.

And the rest is history!

GUADEC 2017 by numbers

I’m finally getting around to doing a bit of a post-mortem for the 2017 edition of GUADEC that we held in Manchester this year. Let’s start with some statistics!

GUADEC 2017 had…

  • 264 registrations (up from 186 last year)
  • 209 attendees (up from 160 last year)
  • 72 people staying at the University (30 of whom had sponsorship awarded by the travel committee)
  • 7 people who were sadly unable to attend because their visa application was refused at the last minute

We put four optional questions on the registration form asking for your country of residence, your age, your gender identity and how you first heard about GUADEC. The full set of responses (anonymous, of course) is available here.

I don’t plan to do much data mining of this, but here are some interesting stats:

  • 61 attendees said they are resident in the UK, roughly 32%.
  • The most common age of attendees was 35 (the full age range was between 11 years and 65 years)
  • 14 attendees said they heard about the conference through working at Codethink

We asked for an optional, “pay as you feel” donation towards the costs of the conference at registration time and we suggested payments of £15/€15 for students, £40/€40 for hobbyists and £150/€150 for professionals.

  • 47 attendees (22%) chose to donate nothing
  • 29 attendees (13%) chose 1-15
  • 75 attendees (36%) chose 16-40
  • 51 attendees (24%) chose >40
  • 7 attendees somehow chose “NULL” (I think these were on-site registrations, which followed a different process)

Note that we told Codethink staff that they shouldn’t feel required to donate from their company-provided conference budget as Codethink was already sponsoring at Platinum level, which should account for 15 or more of the people who chose to donate nothing with their registration.

The financial side of things is tricky for me to summarize as the sponsor money and registration donations mostly went straight to the Foundation’s bank account, which I don’t have access to. The fluctionation of GBP against the US dollar makes my own budget spreadsheet even less reliable,but I estimate that we raised around $10,000 USD for the GNOME Foundation from GUADEC 2017. This is of course only possible due to the generosity of our sponsors, and through the great work that Alberto and Neil did in this area.

My van did 94 miles around Manchester during the week of GUADEC. My house is only 4 miles from the centre so this is surprisingly high!

 

GUADEC Talks Schedule Now Available

As mentioned on the GUADEC 2017 blog, we’ve just published the talks schedule for this year’s edition.

Thanks to everyone who submitted a talk this year, we think there’s a fantastic mix of interesting topics on each day. We sadly had to make some tough decisions and turn down some great submissions as well – we received around 70 talk submissions this year which is a lot to fit into a 3 day, 2 track conference.

It’s now less than 6 weeks until the conference starts! If you’re planning on attending and haven’t yet registered, please register now at registration.guadec.org. It will be possible to register on the day, but we have to finalize room allocations, party venues and food orders way in advance so it will cause problems if everyone waits until the last minute to sign up.

If you’ve not yet booked a room, we have a number of rooms still available at the conference venue. You can book these when you register, or if you already registered then just log into registration.guadec.org and click ‘Edit registration’.

We also have hotel rooms available at fixed prices through Visit Manchester’s hotel booking service. The deadline for booking these rooms is Thursday 29th June.

Thanks to everyone who has opted to volunteer during the conference using the “Keep me informed” box on the registration form. We will be in touch with you very soon to discuss how you can get involved. There’s still time to edit your registration to tick this box if you’ve decided you want to help out on the day!

GUADEC call for talks ends this Sunday, 23rd April

GUADEC 2017 is just over three months away, which is a very long time in the future and leaves lots of time to organise everything (at least that’s what I keep telling myself).

However, the call for papers is closing this Sunday so if you have something you want to talk about in front of the GNOME community and you haven’t already submitted a talk then please head to the registration site and do so!

Once the call for papers closes, the Papers Committee will fetch their ceremonial robes and make their way to a cave deep in the Peak District for two weeks. There they will drink fresh spring water, hunt grouse on the moors and study your talk submissions in great detail. When two weeks is up, their votes are communicated back to Manchester using smoke signals and by Sunday 7th May you’ll be notified by email if your talk was accepted. From there we can organise travel sponsorship and finalize the schedule of the first 3 days of the conference, which should be available late next month.

We’ll put a separate call out for BoF sessions, workshops, and tutorial sessions to take place during the second half of GUADEC — the 23rd April deadline only applies to talks.

GUADEC accommodation

At this year’s GUADEC in Manchester we have rooms available for you right at the venue in lovely modern student townhouses. As I write this there are still some available to book along with your registration. In a couple of days we have to give final numbers to the University for how many rooms we want, so it would help us out if all the folk who want a room there could register and book one now if you haven’t already done so! We’ll have some available for later booking but we have to pay up front for them now so we can’t reserve too many.

Rooms for sponsored attendees are reserved separately so you don’t need to book now if your attendance depends on travel sponsorship.

If you are looking for a hotel, we have a hotel booking service run by Visit Manchester where you can get the best rates from various hotels right up til June 2017. (If you need to arrive before Thursday 27th July then you can to contact Visit Manchester directly for your booking at abs@visitmanchester.com).

We have had some great talk submissions already but there is room for plenty more, so make sure you also submit your idea for a talk before 23rd April!

GUADEC 2017: Friday 28th July to Wednesday 2nd August in Manchester, UK

I'm going to GUADEC 2017

The GUADEC 2017 team is happy to officially announce the dates and location of this year’s conference.

GUADEC 2017 will run from Friday 28th July to Wednesday 2nd August. The first three days will include talks and social events, as well as the GNOME Foundation’s AGM. This part of the conference will also include a 20th anniversary celebration for the GNOME project.

The second 3 days (from Monday 31st July to Wednesday 2nd August) are unconference-style and will include space for hacking, project BoF sessions and possibly training workshops.

The conference days will be at Manchester Metropolitan University’s Brooks Building. The unconference days will be in a nearby University building named The Shed.

Registration and a call for papers will be open later this month. More details, including travel and accommodation tips, are available now at the conference website: https://2017.guadec.org/

We are interested in running training workshops on Monday 31st July but nothing is planned yet. We would like to hear from anyone who interested in helping to organise a training workshop.

Inside view of MMU Brooks Building
Inside view of MMU Brooks Building

 

GUADEC 2017 accommodation survey

We are looking at accommodation options for GUADEC 2017 in Manchester and we would like some feedback from everyone who is hoping to attend!

Manchester’s hotels fill up quickly in summer so we are going to do one or more group bookings now to ensure we have enough rooms for everyone.

There are 3 potential locations we’ve found. I’ve put some details about each place here: https://wiki.gnome.org/GUADEC/2017/Accommodation

If you are hoping to attend next year’s GUADEC, please take a minute to fill the survey here: https://goo.gl/forms/DYcnQLiBBZSSQlH23. If you prefer not to use Google Forms, reply to this mail on guadec-list@gnome.org instead (the questions are listed in the email).

If anyone has data from previous years that could inform our group booking for 2017 then please share it with us. I think the last time GUADEC did pre-booking of accommodation was in A Coruña back in 2012, so if anyone has numbers on how many rooms were taken and how many nights each person stayed for that year, or any before, it would help us a lot.

Here are the options in brief (see the wiki for more details):

Youth hostel

  • 4-bed dorms
  • £33 per night
  • Breakfast £1.95 extra (must be quite a small breakfast 🙂
  • 1.2 miles from venue
  • Near the city centre
000165_manchester_beds_034000165_manchester_exterior_001

University ‘townhouse’ residences

  • Single bedrooms with 12 bedrooms in each house
  • £43 a night, or £52 including buffet breakfast
  • Right next to the venue, about a mile from the city centre
bir0
17318143172_2bb2c7b6e0_k

Jury’s Inn Hotel

  • Hotel with single/double and twin rooms
  • ~£94 per night for a single, ~£51 each if you can double up.
  • Breakfast £10 extra.
  • 0.6 miles from the venue and right in the city centre.
manchester-exterior-1manchester-bedroom-5

Please fill out the survey to have your say on which accommodation you’d prefer to have!