Why I love Bandcamp

The Coronavirus quarantine would be much harder if we didn’t have great music to listen to. But making an income from live music is very difficult in a pandemic. What’s a good way to support the artists who are helping us through?

One ethical way is to buy music on Bandcamp. The idea of Bandcamp is that you browse music (and merch), and if you like something you buy a real download1. You get unlimited web streaming of everything you bought too2. Their business model is clear and upfront:

Our share is 15% on digital items, and 10% on physical goods. Payment processor fees are separate and vary depending on the size of the transaction, but for an average size purchase, amount to an additional 4-7%. The remainder, usually 80-85%, goes directly to the artist, and we pay out daily.

On Friday 1st May 2020, which is tomorrow, or today, or some point in the past, Bandcamp are waiving their 10-%15% share of sales. It’s a great time to buy some music!

Here are some recommendations taken from the recent social media challenge of posting album covers that have a big effect on your music taste, with no other context. (My social media posts are mostly of music recommendations with no context anyway, so this wasn’t much of a challenge).

Orange Whip by Honeyfeet

Widow City by The Fiery Furnaces

at Version City by Victor Rice

Unknown Mortal Orchestra by Unknown Mortal Orchestra

Sonido Amazonico by Chicha Libre

When you’ve listened to those, it’s time to dive into the enourmous list of curated recommendations (curated by real humans, not by robots). The best metal, the best hip-hop, the best contemporary Chinese post-punk, the best Theremin music of the last 100 years, etc. etc. You can also follow me if you want 🙂

In the parallel universe of unethical music services, I read that Spotify have insultingly added a virtual “tip jar”. It can’t make amends for the deeply unfair business relationship that many streaming sites have with artists.

Listen to the T-shirt:


blackdogtee

Have fun & make sure to spend your music money ethically!

1: You can even download in Ogg Vorbis format if you like.
2: In practice, you get unlimited streaming of all the music on Bandcamp. Artists can choose to put a nag screen up after a certain number of listens. Some artists would prefer the site to be more restrictive in this regard.

Tracker documentation improvements

Word Cloud of Tracker ontology documentationIt’s cool storing stuff in a database, but what if you shared the database schema so other tools can work with the data? That’s the basic idea of Linked Data which Tracker tries to follow when indexing your content.

In a closed music database, you might see a “Music” table with a “name” column. What does that mean? Is it the name of a song, an artist, an album, … ? You will have to do some digging to find out.

When Tracker indexes your music, it will create a table called nmm:MusicAlbum. What does that mean? You can click the link to find out, because the database schema is self-documenting. The abbreviation nmm:MusicAlbum expands to a URL, which clearly identifies the type of data being stored.

By formalising the database schema, we create a shared vocabulary for talking about the data. This is very powerful – have you seen GMail Highlights, where a button appears in your email inbox to checkin for a flight and such things? These are powered by the https://schema.org/ shared vocabulary. Google don’t manually add support to GMail for each airline in the world. Instead, the airlines embed a https://schema.org/FlightReservation resource in the confirmation email which GMail uses to show the information. The vocabulary is an open standard, so other email providers can use the same data and even propose improvements. Everyone wins!

Recent improvements

Tracker began 5 years before the creation of schema.org, and we use an older vocabulary from a project called Nepomuk. Tracker may now be the only user of the Nepomuk vocabularies, but to avoid a huge porting effort we have opted to keep using them for 3.0.

Inspired by schema.org documentation, I changed the formatting of Tracker’s schema documentation trying to pack the important information more densely. Compare the 2.x documentation to the 3.x documentation to see what has changed – I think it’s a lot more readable now.

We have also stopped using broken or incorrect URLs. The https://tracker.api.gnome.org/ namespace was recently set up by the incredibly efficient GNOME sysadmins and we can trust it not to disappear at random, unlike the http://tracker-project.org/ and https://www.semanticdesktop.org/ontologies/ namespaces we were using before.

One thing you will notice if you followed the nmm:MusicAlbum link above is that the contents of the documentation still requires some improvement. I hope to see incremental improvements here; if you think you can make it better, please send us a merge request !

CLI documentation

We maintain documentation for the tracker CLI tool in the form of man pages. These were a bit neglected. We now publish the man pages online making it easier to read them and harder to forget they exist.

Internally this is done using Asciidoc and xmlto, plus a small Python script to post-process the output.

User documentation

There is a well-written and quite outdated set of documentation at https://wiki.gnome.org/Projects/Tracker. It’s mostly aimed at setting up Tracker on systems where it doesn’t come ready-integrated – which is a use case we don’t really want to support. I’m a bit stuck as I don’t want to delete what is quite good content, but I also don’t want to maintain documention for things that nobody should need to do…

Documentation hosting

This is a periodic reminder that the library-web script that manages developer.gnome.org needs a major reworking, such as the one proposed here. All the Tracker documentation on http://developer.gnome.org/ is years out of date, because we switched to Meson which requires us to do extra effort on each release to post the documentation. Much kudos is awaiting the people who can resolve this.

Stay tuned

Work is proceeding nicely on Tracker 3.0 and we hope to have the first beta release ready within the next couple of weeks. At that point, there will be opportunities to help with testing app ports and making sure performance is good – I will keep you posted here!