Sculpting Tracker 3.0

We’re in the second phase of work to create version 3.0 of the Tracker desktop search engine.

Tracker’s database is now up to date with the latest SPARQL 1.1 standards, including the magical SERVICE statement that lets you combine results from multiple databases in a single query. Now we’re converting the database from a service into a library, and turning the previously monolithic architecture into something more flexible.

Carlos has already done most of this work and the code is pushed as #172 (tracker.git) and  #136 (tracker-miners.git). At times it feels like we’re carving a big block of stone into a sculpture — just look at the diffstats:

    tracker.git: +4214 -10234
    tracker-miners.git: +375 -718

Read merge request #172 for full details, but the highlights are that there’s no more tracker-store daemon, and the libtracker-sparql library which was previously only used for querying and inserting data can now be used to create and manage your own database. You can keep the database private, or you can expose it over D-Bus.

The code in tracker.git is now only about managing data. We may rename it to tracker-sparql in due course, or even to SPARQLite if this is okayed by the developers of SQLite. There’s perhaps a niche for a desktop-scale database that supports SPARQL queries, and it’s a niche that Tracker’s database fits in nicely.

All the code related to desktop indexing and search is now in tracker-miners.git. The tracker-miner-fs daemon will maintain the index in its own database, which you’ll be able to query by connecting over D-Bus just like you used to connect to tracker-store in Tracker 2.0. However, apps running inside Flatpak will not be able to talk directly to the tracker-miner-fs daemon — communication will go through a new portal that Carlos is currently working on, allowing us to implement per-app access controls to your data for the first time.

We are still pending a Tracker 2.3.2 bugfix release too! This month Victor Gal solved an issue that was causing photo geolocation metadata to be ignored. Rasmus Thomsen also added Alpine Linux to our CI, and the GNOME translation teams have been hard at work too.

If you want to help out by testing, developing, documenting Tracker – get in touch on  GNOME Discourse (use the ‘tracker’ tag) or irc.gnome.org #tracker.

About Sam Thursfield

Who's that kid in the back of the room? He's setting all his papers on fire! Where did he get that crazy smile? We all think he's really weird.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Sculpting Tracker 3.0

  1. jean says:

    Awesome work! Thank you Sam and Carlos.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.