Into the Pyramid

November 2019 wasn’t an easy month, for various reasons, and it also rained every single day of the month. But there were some highlights!

LibreTeo

At the bus stop one day I saw a poster for a local Free Software related event called LibreTeo. Of course I went, and saw some interesting talks related to technology and culture and also a useful workshop on improving your clown skills. Actually the clown workshop was a highlight. It was a small event but very friendly, I met several local Free Software heads, and we were even invited for lunch with the volunteers who organized it.

Purr Data on Flathub

I want to do my part for increasing the amount of apps that are easy to install Linux. I asked developers to Flatpak your app today last year, and this month I took the opportunity to package Purr Data on Flathub.

Here’s a quick demo video, showing one of the PD examples which generates an ‘audible illusion’ of a tone that descends forever, known as a Shepard Tone.

As always the motivation is a selfish one. I own an Organelle synth – it’s a hackable Linux-based device that generates sound using Pure Data, and I want to be able to edit the patches!

Pure Data is a very powerful open source tool for audio programming, but it’s never had much commercial interest (unlike its proprietary sibling Max/MSP) and that’s probably why the default UI is still implemented in TCL/TK in 2019. The Purr Data fork has made a lot of progress on an alternative HTML5/JavaScript UI, so I decided this would be more suitable for a Flathub package.

I was particularly motivated by the ongoing Pipewire project which is aiming to unify pro and consumer audio APIs on Linux in a Flatpak-friendly way. Christian Schaller mentioned this recently:

There is also a plan to have a core set of ProAudio applications available as Flatpaks for Fedora Workstation 32 tested and verified to work perfectly with Pipewire.

The Purr Data app will benefit a lot from this work. It currently has to use the OSS backend inside the sandbox and doesn’t seem to successfully communicate over MIDI either — so it’s rather a “tech preview” at this stage.

The developers of Purr Data are happy about the Flatpak packaging, although they aren’t interested in sharing the maintenance effort right now. If anyone reading this would like to help me with improving and maintaining the Purr Data Flatpak, please get in touch! I expect the effort required to be minimal, but I’d like to have a bus factor > 1.

Tracker bug fixes

This month we fixed a couple of issues in Tracker which were causing system lockups for some people. It was very encouraging to see people volunteering their time to help track down the issue, both in Gitlab issue 95 and in #tracker on IRC, and everyone involved in the discussion stayed really positive even though it’s obviously quite annoying when your computer keeps freezing.

In the end there were several things that come together to cause system lockups:

  • Tracker has a ‘generic image extraction’ rule that tries to find metadata for any image/* MIME type that isn’t a .bmp, .jpg, .gif, or .png. This codepath uses the GstDiscoverer API, the same as for video and audio files, in the hope that a GStreamer plugin on the system can give us useful info about the image.
  • The GstDiscoverer instance is created with a timeout of 5 seconds. (This seems quite high — the gst-typefind utility that ships with GStreamer uses a timeout of 1 second).
  • GStreamer’s GstDiscoverer API feeds any file where the type is unknown into an MPEG decoder, which is effectively an unwanted fuzz test and can trigger periods of high CPU and memory usage.
  • 5 seconds of processing non-MPEG data with an MPEG decoder is somehow enough to cause Linux’s scheduler to lock up the entire system.

We fixed this in the stable branches by blocking certain problematic MIME types. In the next major release of Tracker we will probably remove this codepath completely as the risks seem to outweigh the benefits.

Other bits

I also did some work on a pet project of mine called Calliope, related with music recommendations and playlist generation. More on this in a separate blog post.

And I finally installed Fedora on my partner’s laptop. It was nice to see that Gnome Shell works out-of-the-box on 12 year old consumer hardware. The fan, which was spinning 100% of the time under Windows 8, is virtually silent now – I had actually thought this problem was due to dust buildup or a hardware issue, but once again the cause was actually low-quality proprietary software.

About Sam Thursfield

Who's that kid in the back of the room? He's setting all his papers on fire! Where did he get that crazy smile? We all think he's really weird.
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2 Responses to Into the Pyramid

  1. Pingback: Sam Thursfield: Into the Pyramid https://samthursfield.wordpress.co… | Dr. Roy Schestowitz (罗伊)

  2. Pingback: Links 2/12/2019: Linux Mint 19.3 Beta, DPL Sam Hartman Talks About SystemD | Techrights

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