The Lesson Planalyzer

I’ve now been working as a teacher for 8 months. There are a lot of things I like about the job. One thing I like is that every day brings a new deadline. That sounds bad right? It’s not: one day I prepare a class, the next day I deliver the class one or more times and I get instant feedback on it right there and then from the students. I’ve seen enough of the software industry, and the music industry, to know that such a quick feedback loop is a real privilege!

Creating a lesson plan can be a slow and sometimes frustrating process, but the more plans I write the more I can draw on things I’ve done before. I’ve planned and delivered over 175 different lessons already. It’s sometimes hard to know if I’m repeating myself or not, or if I could be reusing an activity from a past lesson, so I’ve been looking for easy ways to look back at all my old lesson plans.

Search

GNOME’s Tracker search engine provides a good starting point for searching a setof lesson plans: I can put the plans in my ~/Documents folder, open the folder in Nautilus, and then I type a term like "present perfect" into the search bar.

Screenshot of Nautilus showing search results

The results aren’t as helpful as they could be, though. I can only see a short snippet of the text in each document, when I really need to see the whole paragraph for the result to be directly useful. Also, the search returns anything where the words present and perfect appear, so we could be talking about tenses, or birthdays, or presentation skills.  I wanted a better approach.

Reading .docx files

My lesson plans have a fairly regular structure. An all-purpose search tool doesn’t know anything about my personal approach to writing lesson plans, though. I decided to try writing my own tool to extract more structured information from the documents. The plans are in .docx format1 which is remarkably easy to parse — you just need the Python ‘unzip’ and ‘xml’ modules, and some guesswork to figure out what the XML elements mean. I was surprised not to find a Python library that already did this for me, but in the end I wrote a very basic .docx helper module, and I used this to create a tool that read my existing lesson plans and dumped the data as a JSON document.

It works reliably! In a few cases I chose to update documents rather than add code to the tool to deal with formatting inconsistencies. Also, the tool currently throws away all formatting information, but I barely notice.

Web and desktop apps

From there, of course, things got out of control and I started writing a simple web application to display and search the lesson plans. Two months of sporadic effort later, and I just made a prototype release of The Lesson Planalyzer. It remains to be seen how useful it is for anyone, including me, but it’s very satisfying to have gone from an idea to a prototype application in such a short time. Here’s an ugly screenshot, which displays a couple of example lesson plans that I found online.

The user interface is HTML5, made using Bootstrap and a couple of other cool JavaScript libraries (which I might mention in a separate blog post). I’ve wrapped that up in a basic GTK application, which runs a tiny HTTP server and uses a WebKitWebView display its output. The desktop application has a couple of features that can’t be implemented inside a browser, one is the ability to open plan documents directly in LibreOffice, and also the other is a dedicated entry in the alt+tab menu.

If you’re curious, you can see the source at https://gitlab.com/samthursfield/planalyzer/. Let me know if you think it might be useful for you!

1. I need to be able to print the documents on computers which don’t have LibreOffice available, so they are all in .docx format.

About Sam Thursfield

Who's that kid in the back of the room? He's setting all his papers on fire! Where did he get that crazy smile? We all think he's really weird.
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1 Response to The Lesson Planalyzer

  1. Pingback: What I did in October | Sam Thursfield's Blog

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