How Tracker is tested in 2019

I became interested in the Tracker project in 2011. I was looking at media file scanning and was happy to discover an active project that was focused on the same thing. I wanted to contribute, but I found it very hard to test my changes; and since Tracker runs as a daemon I really didn’t want to introduce any crazy regressions.

In those days Tracker already had a set of tests written in Python that tested the Tracker daemons as a whole, but they were a bit unfinished and unreliable. I focused some spare-time effort on improving those. Surprisingly enough it’s taken eight years to get the point where I’m happy with how they work.

The two biggest improvements parallel changes in many other GNOME projects. Last year Tracker stopped using GNU Autotools in favour of Meson, after a long incubation period. I probably don’t need to go into detail of how much better this is for developers. Also, we set up GitLab CI to automatically run the test suite, where previously developers and maintainers were required to run the test suite manually before merging anything. Together, these changes have made it about 100000% easier to review patches for Tracker, so if you were considering contributing code to the project I can safely say that there has never been a better time!

The Tracker project is now divided into two parts, the ‘core’ (tracker.git) and the ‘miners’ (tracker-miners.git) . The core project contains the database and the application interface libraries, while the miners project contains the daemons that scan your filesystem and extract metadata from your interesting files.

Let’s look at what happens automatically when you submit a merge request on GNOME GitLab for the tracker-miners project:

  1. The .gitlab-ci.yml file specifies a Docker image to be used for running tests. The Docker images are built automatically from this project and are based on Fedora.
  2. The script in .gitlab-ci.yml clones the ‘master’ version of Tracker core.
  3. The tracker and tracker-miners projects are configured and built, using Meson. There is a special build option in tracker-miners that makes it include Tracker core as a Meson subproject, instead of building against the system-provided version. (It still depends on a few files from host at the time of writing).
  4. The script starts a private D-Bus session using dbus-run-session, sets a fixed en_US.UTF8 locale, and runs the test suite for tracker-miners using meson test.
  5. Meson runs the tests that are defined in meson.build files. It tries to run them in parallel with one test per CPU core.
  6. The libtracker-miners-common tests exercises some utility code, which is duplicated from libtracker-common in Tracker core.
  7. The libtracker-extract tests exercises libtracker-extract, which is a private library with helper code for accessing file metadata. It mainly focuses on standard metadata formats like XMP and EXIF.
  8. The functional-300-miner-basic-ops and functional-301-resource-removal tests check the operation of the tracker-miner-fs daemon, mostly by copying files in and out of a specific path and then waiting for the corresponding changes to the Tracker database to take effect.
  9. The functional-310-fts-basic test tries some full-text search operations on a text file. There are a couple of other FTS tests too.
  10. The functional/extract/* tests effectively run tracker extract on a set of real media files, and test that the expected metadata is extracted. The tests are defined by JSON files such as this one.
  11. The functional-500-writeback tests exercise the tracker-writeback daemon (which allows updating things like MP3 tags following changes in the Tracker database). These tests are not particularly thorough. The writeback feature of Tracker is not widely used, to my knowledge.
  12. Finally, the functional-600-* tests simulate the behaviour of some MeeGo phone applications. Yes, that’s how old this code is πŸ™‚

There is plenty of room for more testing of course, but this list is very comprehensive when compared to the total lack of automated testing that the project had just a year ago!

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About Sam Thursfield

Who's that kid in the back of the room? He's setting all his papers on fire! Where did he get that crazy smile? We all think he's really weird.
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3 Responses to How Tracker is tested in 2019

  1. Jos says:

    What is the test coverage?

  2. Pingback: How Tracker is tested in 2019 https://samthursfield.wordpress.com/2… | Dr. Roy Schestowitz (η½—δΌŠ)

  3. Carlos Garnacho says:

    Jos, I did run it recently on tracker.git and it was somewhere between 65-70%.

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